Traffic-Insensitive Scheduling Design in Wireless Networks

Abstract:
The rapid growth of smart phones as well as other intelligent wireless devices generates significant amount of diversified traffic ranging from sending warning messages to watching online videos over wireless networks such as cellular networks, Internet of Things, and cyber-physical systems. Such wide range of traffic calls for the development of wireless algorithms with traffic-insensitive performance in the sense that the network performance (such as throughput and latency) does not depend on the distribution of network traffic except the mean traffic load. This is tremendously valuable in the presence of highly heterogeneous wireless applications. In this talk, we will discuss the recent progress and research challenges in developing such wireless scheduling algorithms.
Bio:
Bin Li received his B.S. degree in Electronic and Information Engineering in 2005, M.S. degree in Communication and Information Engineering in 2008, both from Xiamen University, and Ph.D. degree in Electrical and Computer Engineering from The Ohio State University in May 2014. Between June 2014 and August 2016, he was a Postdoctoral Researcher working with Prof. R. Srikant in the Coordinated Science Lab at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. In August 2016, he joined the University of Rhode Island as an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical, Computer and Biomedical Engineering. His research spans wireless networks, virtual and augmented reality, fog computing, and age-of-information. In particular, his research utilizes mathematical tools from stochastic processes, optimization, control, and algorithms to understand fundamental performance limits of complex network systems, and develop efficient, adaptable, and scalable algorithms for diverse applications.